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Fired Colorado handyman, 56, accused of intentionally blowing up an apartment complex

Todd Perkins (above), 56, was arrested on Monday after police identified him as the architect of an explosion at a Denver apartment in August. He’s been charged with attempted first-degree murder and first-degree arson

Todd Perkins (above), 56, was arrested on Monday after police identified him as the architect of an explosion at a Denver apartment in August. He’s been charged with attempted first-degree murder and first-degree arson

A Colorado handyman who was let go from his job at a residential complex has been arrested on suspicion of attempted first-degree murder, after police say he’s responsible for intentionally causing an explosion at the building last August.

Todd Perkins, 56, allegedly orchestrated the blast after he became embroiled in a dispute with residents at the 365 Santa Fe Drive address, in Denver.

The explosion left one woman trapped beneath a pile of rubble and injured seven others.

Two were said to have been left in a critical condition as a result of the blast – one of whom was the defendant.

Perkins was arrested on Monday at a therapeutic medical facility and now faces one charge of first-degree arson, and one charge of attempted first-degree murder.

Authorities say the 56-year-old disconnected gas pipes to a furnace, water heater and a stove, and left the valves open to fill the building’s basement with gas on August 14.

Nine people were injured in the blast, according to authorities. Two were left in a critical condition, including Perkins (pictured: the front of 365 Santa Fe Drive is completely destroyed by the explosion, on August 14)

Nine people were injured in the blast, according to authorities. Two were left in a critical condition, including Perkins (pictured: the front of 365 Santa Fe Drive is completely destroyed by the explosion, on August 14)

Court documents reveal that Perkins has a criminal history spanning back to 2009, including criminal mischief, assault and driving under the influence

Court documents reveal that Perkins has a criminal history spanning back to 2009, including criminal mischief, assault and driving under the influence

He then poured gasoline on the floor to ‘further fuel an explosion’, Denver Fire Department spokesman, Greg Pixely, said yesterday.

Perkins is then said to have turned to furnace up to 82 degrees to act as an ignition for a fiery explosion.

However, the furnace’s temperature accelerated the fire quicker than the accused had anticipated and it exploded as he reached the top of the basement stairs.

The defendant was thrown through the front wall of the building and buried in a pile of rubble in the street.

Police were able to identify Perkins as a suspect after investigators smelled gasoline on his clothing as he was being transported to the hospital.

Perkins is alleged to have broken into the building where he once worked, disconnect engaged gas pipes and pour gasoline onto the basement floor. However, police say Perkins’ over estimated his measurements and failed to flee the scene before the explosion erupted

Perkins is alleged to have broken into the building where he once worked, disconnect engaged gas pipes and pour gasoline onto the basement floor. However, police say Perkins’ over estimated his measurements and failed to flee the scene before the explosion erupted

Prior to the explosion, Perkins had been released from his duty as the building’s handyman after a series of disputes with the owner and tenants of the property.

Authorities haven’t revealed exactly when Perkins was fired, or what the arguments entailed.

It’s believed he inadvertently splashed fuel over himself as he was pouring it over the basement floor.

Court documents reveal that Perkins has a criminal history spanning back to 2009.

The charges include driving under the influence, criminal mischief and assault.

Fire officials smelled gas on Perkins’ clothes as he was being transported to the hospital. He was later identified as the key suspect when sniffer dogs detected gasoline on the building’s basement floor

Fire officials smelled gas on Perkins’ clothes as he was being transported to the hospital. He was later identified as the key suspect when sniffer dogs detected gasoline on the building’s basement floor

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